Confidence in Tsai down as first year in office nears end: Survey

A new survey by online newspaper My Formosa shows that public confidence in President Tsai Ing-wen has fallen since she took office.

In the survey, 40% of respondents reported having confidence in the president whereas almost 44% say they are not confident. The largest drop in confidence was among those aged 20 to 29. Only 36% of respondents in this age bracket said they have confidence in Tsai, compared to 67% when she took office last May.

Meanwhile, overall satisfaction with Tsai's performance sits at around 32%, while 57% of the public are dissatisfied. New Power Party lawmaker Hsu Yung-ming said during a radio interview Wednesday that compromises in Tsai's reform agenda are drawing criticism.

"There might need to be some compromises at the end in some areas of reform. These compromises will leave both sides unhappy: those who are affected by reforms will feel that though you've made a compromise, you've still hurt their interests. And those who expect reforms will feel that you haven't gone all the way and compromised in the middle," Hsu said. "The labor law reform was one example of this: both employers and employees are not satisfied with it."

Other lawmakers interviewed during the same program spoke about factors behind growing dissatisfaction with the Tsai administration among young people.

They cited the slow pace of reform, poor communication about policies, low incomes, and the government's failure to legalize same-sex marriage as reasons.

Source: Radio Taiwan International

Confidence in Tsai down as first year in office nears end: Survey

A new survey by online newspaper My Formosa shows that public confidence in President Tsai Ing-wen has fallen since she took office.

In the survey, 40% of respondents reported having confidence in the president whereas almost 44% say they are not confident. The largest drop in confidence was among those aged 20 to 29. Only 36% of respondents in this age bracket said they have confidence in Tsai, compared to 67% when she took office last May.

Meanwhile, overall satisfaction with Tsai's performance sits at around 32%, while 57% of the public are dissatisfied. New Power Party lawmaker Hsu Yung-ming said during a radio interview Wednesday that compromises in Tsai's reform agenda are drawing criticism.

"There might need to be some compromises at the end in some areas of reform. These compromises will leave both sides unhappy: those who are affected by reforms will feel that though you've made a compromise, you've still hurt their interests. And those who expect reforms will feel that you haven't gone all the way and compromised in the middle," Hsu said. "The labor law reform was one example of this: both employers and employees are not satisfied with it."

Other lawmakers interviewed during the same program spoke about factors behind growing dissatisfaction with the Tsai administration among young people.

They cited the slow pace of reform, poor communication about policies, low incomes, and the government's failure to legalize same-sex marriage as reasons.

Source: Radio Taiwan International