Premier restates commitment to justice for indigenous groups

Premier Lin Chuan says the government is firmly committed to bringing about transitional justice for Taiwan's indigenous people groups. The premier was speaking Friday while presiding over the fourth meeting for advancing the Indigenous Peoples Basic Law.

"I would like to take this opportunity to specially emphasize to you all that President Tsai Ing-wen and I place great importance on how to achieve transitional justice for indigenous peoples and will strive to bring it about. It is a massive task and advancing the Indigenous Peoples Basic Law is a very important part of that process. Each member of this commission is an expert on aboriginal affairs. I hope we can work together on this platform to do more on behalf of indigenous peoples," said Lin.

Lin noted that the Indigenous Peoples Basic Law was passed in 2005 but since then only three follow-up meetings have been held regarding its implementation and promotion. He said the government will hold more regular hearings in the future.

On August 1, President Tsai Ing-wen apologized to the indigenous peoples of Taiwan for their mistreatment and marginalization since the arrival to the island of Han Chinese settlers four centuries ago.

Source: Radio Taiwan International

Premier restates commitment to justice for indigenous groups

Premier Lin Chuan says the government is firmly committed to bringing about transitional justice for Taiwan's indigenous people groups. The premier was speaking Friday while presiding over the fourth meeting for advancing the Indigenous Peoples Basic Law.

"I would like to take this opportunity to specially emphasize to you all that President Tsai Ing-wen and I place great importance on how to achieve transitional justice for indigenous peoples and will strive to bring it about. It is a massive task and advancing the Indigenous Peoples Basic Law is a very important part of that process. Each member of this commission is an expert on aboriginal affairs. I hope we can work together on this platform to do more on behalf of indigenous peoples," said Lin.

Lin noted that the Indigenous Peoples Basic Law was passed in 2005 but since then only three follow-up meetings have been held regarding its implementation and promotion. He said the government will hold more regular hearings in the future.

On August 1, President Tsai Ing-wen apologized to the indigenous peoples of Taiwan for their mistreatment and marginalization since the arrival to the island of Han Chinese settlers four centuries ago.

Source: Radio Taiwan International