Taiwan must not harbor imagination about U.S. election: scholar

Taiwan should not fool itself or harbor unrealistic expectations of the new United States president no matter who wins the election, a scholar said Wednesday as the vote counting in the U.S. presidential race continued.

Huang Kwei-bo (???), a professor at National Chengchi University, said Taiwan must not think that if Hillary Clinton were to win it would be a tremendous boost or that if Donald Trump won he would defy Beijing for the sake of Taiwan.

"In fact, no matter who wins the election, the United States is unlikely to confront China on issues related to Taiwan," he said.

Taiwan also "should not act rashly" because of Clinton's support for rebalancing toward Asia and Trump's advocacy of strengthening U.S. national defense.

Taiwan must also "refrain from taking sides," Huang said, noting that the Tsai Ing-wen (???) administration seems to prefer Clinton, but there will be dire consequences four years later if Taiwan takes sides.

Taiwan should also not "belittle itself" as it plays a role in U.S. national security strategy. No matter who wins, there will be no "giving up Taiwan" rhetoric for the time being, he contended.

He also said that if Clinton were to win, national security and diplomatic staff from the Bill Clinton administration would return, and because the staff is more familiar with Taiwan, bilateral communications would be smooth.

But if Trump wins, the national security and diplomatic staff will be older and more conservative, and Taiwan may have difficulty in setting up a communication platform early on, Huang opined.

Huang made the remarks at a news conference on the impact of the U.S. election on the Asia-Pacific region, sponsored by National Policy Foundation.

Shen Lyushun (???), Taiwan's former representative to the United States, said on the same occasion that no matter who wins, there are a lot of things that Taiwan should do first.

"Taiwan should return to the basics," Shen said, noting that the biggest support for Taiwan has come from the U.S. Congress, and the public should focus on the congressional elections.

He noted that Trump said in his campaign that Taiwan and other countries have contributed to the losses of U.S. jobs, but statistics have shown that Taiwan has created between 400,000 and 500,000 jobs for the United States.

Yang Cheng-ta (???), Taiwan's former ambassador to Haiti, said the agenda in this year's election focused on major domestic issues.

He said the deep-running frustration of the middle class as well as the rebellion against elite leadership have been reflected in this election.

Former Legislator Lin Yu-fang (???) said this election surprised major media in the U.S. and Trump has a good chance to win.

He said minority voters, who were expected to have a big impact on the election, did not have as high a turnout as expected nor did they support Clinton to as high a degree as expected.

Source: Focus Taiwan News Channel

Taiwan must not harbor imagination about U.S. election: scholar

Taiwan should not fool itself or harbor unrealistic expectations of the new United States president no matter who wins the election, a scholar said Wednesday as the vote counting in the U.S. presidential race continued.

Huang Kwei-bo (???), a professor at National Chengchi University, said Taiwan must not think that if Hillary Clinton were to win it would be a tremendous boost or that if Donald Trump won he would defy Beijing for the sake of Taiwan.

"In fact, no matter who wins the election, the United States is unlikely to confront China on issues related to Taiwan," he said.

Taiwan also "should not act rashly" because of Clinton's support for rebalancing toward Asia and Trump's advocacy of strengthening U.S. national defense.

Taiwan must also "refrain from taking sides," Huang said, noting that the Tsai Ing-wen (???) administration seems to prefer Clinton, but there will be dire consequences four years later if Taiwan takes sides.

Taiwan should also not "belittle itself" as it plays a role in U.S. national security strategy. No matter who wins, there will be no "giving up Taiwan" rhetoric for the time being, he contended.

He also said that if Clinton were to win, national security and diplomatic staff from the Bill Clinton administration would return, and because the staff is more familiar with Taiwan, bilateral communications would be smooth.

But if Trump wins, the national security and diplomatic staff will be older and more conservative, and Taiwan may have difficulty in setting up a communication platform early on, Huang opined.

Huang made the remarks at a news conference on the impact of the U.S. election on the Asia-Pacific region, sponsored by National Policy Foundation.

Shen Lyushun (???), Taiwan's former representative to the United States, said on the same occasion that no matter who wins, there are a lot of things that Taiwan should do first.

"Taiwan should return to the basics," Shen said, noting that the biggest support for Taiwan has come from the U.S. Congress, and the public should focus on the congressional elections.

He noted that Trump said in his campaign that Taiwan and other countries have contributed to the losses of U.S. jobs, but statistics have shown that Taiwan has created between 400,000 and 500,000 jobs for the United States.

Yang Cheng-ta (???), Taiwan's former ambassador to Haiti, said the agenda in this year's election focused on major domestic issues.

He said the deep-running frustration of the middle class as well as the rebellion against elite leadership have been reflected in this election.

Former Legislator Lin Yu-fang (???) said this election surprised major media in the U.S. and Trump has a good chance to win.

He said minority voters, who were expected to have a big impact on the election, did not have as high a turnout as expected nor did they support Clinton to as high a degree as expected.

Source: Focus Taiwan News Channel